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NATIONAL GUARD POSITION DESCRIPTION
 

PD#: NGD1646P01

Sequence#: VARIES

Replaces PD#:   

SUPERVISORY INTELLIGENCE OPERATIONS SPECIALIST

GS-0132-13

Organization Title:

Release Information:

POSITION LOCATION:

Servicing CPAC: NATIONAL GUARD BUREAU

Agency: VARIES

Installation: VARIES

Army Command: VARIES

Region: NATIONAL GUARD

Command Code: VARIES

POSITION CLASSIFICATION STANDARDS USED IN CLASSIFYING/GRADING POSITION:

Citation 1: OPM PCS INTELLIGENCE SERIES, GS-132, APR 60

Citation 2: OPM GENERAL SCHEDULE HRCD-5 JUNE 1998, APRIL 98

Supervisory Certification: I certify that this is an accurate statement of the major duties and responsibilities of this position and its organizational relationships, and that the position is necessary to carry out Government functions for which I am responsible. This certification is made with the knowledge that this information is to be used for statutory purposes relating to appointment and payment of public funds, and that false or misleading statements may constitute violations of such statutes or their implementing regulations.

 

Supervisor Name:  

Reviewed Date:

Classification Review: This position has been classified/graded as required by Title 5, U.S. Code in conformance with standard published by the U.S. Office of Personnel Management or if no published standards apply directly, consistently with the most applicable published standards.

 

Reviewed By: DEBRA J. SPILMAN. NG-J1-TNC

Reviewed Date: 04/26/2004

POSITION INFORMATION:

Cyber Workforce:

  • Primary Work Role: VARIES
  • Additional Work Role 1: VARIES
  • Additional Work Role 2: VARIES

Component Designation:

FLSA: EXEMPT

FLSA Worksheet: EXEMPT

FLSA Appeal: NO

Bus Code: VARIES

DCIPS PD: NO

  • Mission Category: VARIES
  • Work Category: VARIES
  • Work Level: VARIES

Acquisition Position: NO

  • CAP:  
  • Career Category:  
  • Career Level:  

Functional Code:  

Interdisciplinary: NO

Supervisor Status: VARIES

PD Status: VERIFIED

CONDITION OF EMPLOYMENT:

Drug Test Required: VARIES  

Financial Mgmt Cert:

Position Designation: VARIES

Position Clearance: VARIES

Position Sensitivity: VARIES

Sec. Clearance Level: VARIES

Sec. Access (Child Care Bkgd Check): VARIES

Emergency Essential:   

Requires Access to Firearms: VARIES

Personnel Reliability Position: VARIES

Information Assurance: VARIES

Influenza Vaccination:  

Financial Disclosure: VARIES

Financial Disclosure: NO  

Enterprise Position: VARIES

POSITION ASSIGNMENT:

Competitive Area: VARIES

Competitive Level: VARIES

Career Program: VARIES

Career Ladder PD: NO

Target Grade/FPL:  

Career Pos 1:    

Career Pos 2:    

Career Pos 3:    

Career Pos 4:   

Career Pos 5:    

Career Pos 6:   

POSITION DUTIES:

PD released as part of CRA 07-1003 - ANG Predator - 2 Intel Ops Supv & Pen & Ink Chgs
Originally released as part of CRA 04-1014 - ANG Intelligence PDs

Organizational Title: Mission Operations Commander

a. INTRODUCTION:

This position is located in the Intelligence exploitation section at an Air National Guard (ANG) Intelligence unit. The primary purpose of the position is to perform specialized intelligence duties as a Intelligence Surveillance Reconnaissance (ISR) Unit crew commander, supervises through subordinate leaders or supervisors three or more sections of Intelligence Operations Specialists and to train assigned military unit members in the duties and functions associated with multi-intelligence (multi-INT) Tasking, Processing, Exploitation, and Dissemination (TPED) activities. Provides real-time TPED support to National Agencies, Joint Commands, Air Force Major Commands (MAJCOMs), Air Operations Centers (AOCs), and US and coalition airborne assets in exercises and contingency operations. Ensures real-time and near-real-time multi-INT reporting and analysis by all exploitation sections.

b. DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

(1) Supervises through subordinate work leaders or supervisors three or more sections of Intelligence Operations Specialists, each sections containing a base level of GS-11.

(a) Plans, organizes, and oversees the activities of the subordinate ISR unit crew members. Establishes, revises, or reviews policies, procedures, mission objectives, and organization design for the staff, as necessary to eliminate work problems or barriers to mission accomplishment, promotes team building, implements quality improvements, or in response to concerns with regulatory compliance and/or customer requirements. Plans work for accomplishment by subordinate sections, sets and adjusts short-term priorities, and prepares schedules based on consideration of difficulty of requirements and assignments such that the experience, training, and abilities of the staff are effectively utilized to meet organization and customer needs. Provides subordinate supervisors, work leaders and staff with direction and advice regarding policies, procedures, and guidelines. Reviews and structures organization to optimize use of resources and maximize efficiency and effectiveness of the organization. Balances workload and provides overall direction and vision to the subordinate section chiefs on a wide range of intelligence, information management and administrative issues. Establishes metric and analysis systems for sections managed to assess efficiency, effectiveness, and compliance with regulatory procedures. Evaluates requirements for additional resources submitted by subordinate supervisors/work leaders, and balances organization needs with overall mission requirements and resource interests. Identifies need for change in organization priorities and takes action to implement such changes. Plans and schedules work in such a manner that promotes a smooth flow and even distribution and ensures effective use of organization resources to achieve organization goals and objectives. Establishes review systems for the organization that make certain intelligence mission needs are met and validated, and that economy and quality of operations are maintained or improved. Accepts, amends, or rejects work of subordinate supervisors/work leaders. Reviews work and management techniques of subordinate supervisors/work leaders and is held accountable for actions taken and advice provided by staff of subordinate sections. Makes decisions on work problems presented by subordinate supervisors/work leaders. Directs self-assessment activities of subordinate supervisors/work leaders. Reviews training recommended by subordinate supervisors/work leaders to assure it is proper and promotes effective operation of the organization as a whole.

(b) Exercises supervisory personnel management responsibilities. Directs, coordinates, and oversees work through subordinate supervisors/work leaders. Advises staff regarding policies, procedures, and directives of higher-level management or headquarters. Selects candidates for subordinate non-supervisory and supervisory positions taking into consideration skills and qualifications, mission requirements, and EEO and diversity objectives. Ensures reasonable equity among sections of performance standards developed, modified, and/or interpreted and rating techniques developed by subordinate supervisors/work leaders. Explains performance expectations to subordinate supervisors/work leaders and employees directly supervised and provides regular feedback on strengths and weaknesses. Appraises performance of subordinate supervisors/work leaders and other employees directly supervised and serves as reviewing official on evaluation of non-supervisory employees rated by subordinate supervisors. Approves expenses comparable to within-grade increases, extensive overtime, and employee travel. Recommends awards for non-supervisory personnel and changes in position classification to higher-level managers. Hears and resolves group grievances and employee complaints referred by subordinate supervisors/work leaders and employees. Initiates action to correct performance or conduct problems of employees directly supervised and reviews and/or approves serious disciplinary actions (e.g. suspensions, removals) involving non-supervisory subordinates. Ensures documentation prepared to support actions is proper and complete. Reviews developmental needs of subordinate supervisors, work leaders and non-supervisory employees and makes decisions on non-routine, costly or controversial training needs and/or requests for unit employees. Encourages self-development. Approves leave for subordinate supervisors/work leaders and ensures adequate coverage in organization through peak workloads and traditional holiday vacation time. Demonstrates sensitivity to ideas of subordinates. Ensures actions taken directly as well as those by subordinate supervisors/work leaders promote an environment in which employees are empowered to participate in and contribute to effective mission accomplishment. Discharges security responsibilities by ensuring education and compliance with security directives for employees with access to classified or sensitive material. Recognizes and takes appropriate action to correct situations posing a threat to the health or safety of subordinates. Applies EEO/affirmative employment principles and requirements to all personnel management actions and decisions, and ensures all personnel are treated in a manner free of discrimination. Explains classification determinations to subordinate employees.

(c) Exercises responsibility for oversight of various unit activities and operations, including any or all of the intelligence unit functional areas of training, standardization and evaluation, development of tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTP), simulation exercises, scheduling, plans, intelligence collection and production, analysis and reporting, mission management, and mission computer systems. Accountable for all facets of unit missions. Monitors work of subordinates and reviews written reports. Formulates section policy and gives guidance to subordinates to ensure that applicable DoD and Federal policies, procedures, and instructions are properly implemented to achieve section operational readiness. Develops long-range training, intelligence, and deployment plans for the section to meet training goals, higher headquarters inspection schedules, and overseas deployment requirements. Coordinates required planning and resources with other units such as theater combatant commanders, NSA, AIA, and NGB to support and implement the training and deployment plan. Directs the development of section training goals and long range advanced planning, which include facility/equipment modernization, improvement, or replacement. Develops and oversees the development of detailed plans for accomplishment of these training goals and advanced plans.

(2) Serves as a ISR unit crew commander, responsible and accountable for all facets of ISR unit operations and production to include time critical targeting (TCT), direct threat warning, battle damage assessment, combat identification, combat search and rescue, multi-INT correlation, threat analysis, mapping, intelligence preparation of the battlespace, situation monitoring, and mission reporting.

(a) Directs multi-INT correlation of data from multiple intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) platforms and intelligence products. Approves dynamic sensor retasking and updates to navigation and collection plans based on time critical information and cross-cueing sensor/tip-offs from other platforms. Assesses incoming and exploited mission data and provides cross-cueing sensor/tip-offs to other platforms and exploitation sections improving multi-INT correlation. Ensures crewmembers are updating Air Force ISR unit components and C4I nodes on mission findings. Ensures information is dispatched to National Agencies, Joint Commands, Air Force MAJCOMs, and AOCs to insure receipt for timely insertion into the aerospace campaign plan. Establishes crewmember duties relating to the reception and correlation of multi-INT reports, tasking requests, and updated collection plans. Dynamically manages mission planning, programming, and reprogramming of ISR assets (ISR battle management), including commercial satellites, and allocate the reconnaissance workload across platforms, and verify automated and combined navigation and imagery intelligence (IMINT), signals intelligence (SIGINT), and measurements and signatures intelligence (MASINT) collection plans for each mission. Leads pre-mission conferences to outline mission objectives, potential threats, and possible outcomes.

(b) Provides input on performance evaluation, career guidance, and technical assistance to full-time and traditional intelligence personnel. Establishes intelligence information requirements, procedures, and work schedules not predetermined by higher headquarters. Assigns in writing specific programs and duties to full-time and traditional intelligence personnel in accordance with applicable Air Force, MAJCOM, and ANG instructions. Develops and refines tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTP) and concepts of operations (CONOPS) to resolve unprecedented intelligence problems and develops experimental approaches and solutions.

(c) Reviews and approves post-mission reports containing the analysis derived from each exploitation function. Prepares and releases the final ISR unit crew commander post-mission report. Briefs analysis findings and estimates to the unit commander and mission planners. Publishes finished reports and documents for use by decision-makers in the squadron, AOC, Air Force MAJCOMs, Joint Commands, and the National Agencies. Researches, analyzes, and plans overall ISR unit crew exploitation activities in preparation for operational missions. Manages allotted resources for operations and analysis activities. Communicates with other intelligence departments and agencies to share data and techniques, findings, and planning for future operations.

(d) Assures ISR unit crews maintain the capability to provide timely and accurate operational intelligence support and fully trained intelligence personnel during exercises and contingency operations. Coordinates with the gaining command on operational intelligence elements needed to carry out coordination and liaison with counterparts and colleagues in such other major command intelligence organizations as Air Combat Command (ACC), National Guard Bureau (NGB), United States Air Forces Europe (USAFE), Pacific Air Forces (PACAF) and such other governmental agencies as Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA), National Security Agency (NSA), US Space Command (SPACECOM), Air Intelligence Agency (AIA), US Strategic Command (USSTRATCOM), and the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). Incumbent represents the organization at interagency conferences and meetings that deal with specialty functions and internal training requirements at the unit level.

(e) Recognized as an organization expert within functional assignment. Serves as the unit authority on all aspects of ISR unit crew internal training. Commits personnel to missions and special exercises, including coordinating with outside agencies, under the general direction of the unit commander. Represents the unit in making agreements and commitments within the scope of his/her assigned functional area of expertise. Provides guidance and assistance to unit and gaining command intelligence specialists and serves to coordinate on projects jointly undertaken by the unit, gaining command, and other organizations.

(f) Coordinates ISR unit crew training requirements with gaining command intelligence section. Oversees the development of objectives and work schedules for training assigned ISR unit crewmembers during Unit Training Assemblies (UTA), Annual Training (AT), and unit deployments. Identifies training requirements and conducts or organizes training courses for intelligence personnel on ISR unit mission related subjects. Serves as Subject Matter Expert (SME), trainer, and task certifier for all ISR unit crewmember Initial Qualification Training (IQT), Mission Qualification Training (MQT), and Continuation Training (CT). Incumbent works with the subordinates and Unit Training Manager to identify shortfalls and develop plans to correct them.

(g) Plans, organizes, establishes, and manages the methodology for deployment and conduct of intelligence operations during contingency operations. Oversees the ISR unit crew mobility program and the pre-deployment spin-up training program for unit personnel. Identifies and corrects mobility deficiencies. Identifies required intelligence equipment and publications for home station and deployed operations.

(h) Prepares and manages the budgeting of fiscal resources for the ISR unit. Consults and contributes budgetary expertise to all aspects of intelligence operations. Assesses the application of the ISR unit budget and forecasts the resources necessary for future requirements. Forecasts future formal training requirements for full-time and traditional ISR unit crewmembers.

(3) Performs other duties as assigned.

c. FACTOR DISCUSSION:

Factor 1. Program Scope and Effect

The incumbent manages an intelligence organization. The majority of the work over which this position has supervisory responsibility falls primarily within the intelligence series. The intelligence work performed within the unit involves the collection, analysis, evaluation, interpretation, and dissemination of information on military conditions, trends and forces in foreign and domestic areas that directly or indirectly affect the national security. In carrying out the assigned duties and responsibilities of the position, the incumbent is required to possess and exercise thorough and current knowledge of force-level intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance operations necessary to plan, conduct, and assess aerospace operations. The incumbent is tasked with technical oversight of the activities of lower-level specialists. The unit provides complex technical services to Air Force Major Commands and intelligence services of other government agencies.

Factor 2. Organizational Setting

The incumbent is accountable to a position that is two or more reporting levels below the first SES or general officer. Incumbent independently performs duties without specific instructions. Due to the changing complexities of real-time missions, leadership, sound judgment, ingenuity, and the ability to shift paradigms instantaneously are essential to mission success and for the in-flight safety and survival of operational USAF assets. Incumbent is relied on to complete these assignments without assistance from supervisor or peers. Completed work is reviewed in terms of methodology, approach, and the accomplishment of mission goals and objectives.

Factor 3. Supervisory and Managerial Authority Exercised

Exercises full first level and second level supervisory authorities and responsibilities over subordinate sections of Intelligence Operations Specialists.

Factor 4 - Personal Contacts
Sub factor 4A. Nature of Contacts

Contacts are with a variety of counterparts and high-ranking military and civilian managers, supervisors and technical staff at major organizational levels within the ANG and NGB and with comparable personnel in other Federal intelligence agencies. Contacts often occur in meetings and conferences as well as unplanned one-on-one contacts regarding intelligence operational issues for which the incumbent is recognized as the authoritative point of contact for the unit. These meetings often require extensive preparation of briefing materials or extensive research of current intelligence issues. The incumbent must remain up-to-date on domestic and foreign intelligence.

Sub factor 4B. Purpose of Contacts

The incumbent provides authoritative advice, information and guidance regarding current intelligence issues. In addition, he/she coordinates, presents, and negotiates programs, projects, policies and controversial issues of significant impact on supported operational missions. The incumbent regularly participates in conferences and meetings involving significant issues affecting the mission of the unit.

Factor 5. Difficulty of Typical Work Directed

The position is responsible for providing second level direction and supervision over work performed by subordinates at the GS-11 level which best characterizes the nature of the basic, mission oriented, non-supervisory work performed in the organization and which constitutes 25 percent or more of the workload (not positions or employees) of the organization. The work directed involves oversight of all unit intelligence operations activities.

Factor 6. Other Conditions

The position manages the organization through subordinate supervisors who each direct substantial workloads comparable to the GS-11 level. Requires coordination, integration, or consolidation of administrative or technical work on all intelligence matters. This work includes intelligence processes, support requirements and technical assets of the DCGS ISR unit weapons systems. The work is also judgmental and evaluative in nature. The incumbent frequently resolves conflicts and uses interpretation, judgment, logic, and policy application.

d. OTHER SIGNIFICANT FACTS:

--Must obtain and maintain a Top Secret/Special Compartmented Information (TS/SCI) security clearance.
--Required to perform shift work and may be required to work uncommon tours on short notice.


Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) Determination = (EXEMPT)

 

1. Availability Pay Exemption - (e.g., Criminal Investigators, U.S. Customs and Border Protection pilots who are also Law Enforcement Officers).

 

2. Foreign Exemption - (Note: Puerto Rico and certain other locations do not qualify for this exemption – See 5 CFR 551.104 for a list of Nonexempt areas.)

 

3. Executive Exemption:

    

a. Exercises appropriate management responsibility (primary duty) over a recognized organizational unit with a continuing function, AND

    

b. Customarily and regularly directs 2 or more employees, AND

    

c. Has the authority to make or recommend hiring, firing, or other status-change decisions, when such recommendations have particular weight.

 

4. Professional Exemption:

    

a. Professional work (primary duty)

    

b. Learned Professional, (See 5 CFR, 551.208 ) (Registered Nurses, Dental Hygienists, Physician’s Assistants, Medical Technologists, Teachers, Attorneys, Physicians, Dentists, Podiatrists, Optometrists, Engineers, Architects, and Accountants at the independent level as just some of the typical examples of exempt professionals). Or

    

c. Creative Professional, (See 5 CFR, 551.209 ) (The primary duty requires invention and originality in a recognized artistic field (music, writing, etc.) and does not typically include newspapers or other media or work subject to control by the organization are just some examples of Creative Professionals). Or

    

d. Computer Employee, (See 5 CFR, 551.210 ) ( must meet salary test and perform such duties as system analysis, program/system design, or program/system testing, documentation, and modification). Computer manufacture or repair is excluded (non-exempt work).

 

5. Administrative Exemption:

    

a. Primary duty consistent with 5 CFR 551 (e.g.; non-manual work directly related to the management or general business operations of the employer or its customers), AND job duties require exercise of discretion & independent judgment.

  FLSA Conclusion:
  Exempt
  Non Exempt


FLSA Comments/Explanations:

Executive Exemption


CONDITIONS OF EMPLOYMENT & NOTES:



POSITION EVALUATION:

A. Title, Series, and Grade: Intelligence Operations Specialist, GS-0132-13

B. References:

1. USOPM Position Classification Standard for Intelligence Series, GS-0132, April 1960.
2. USOPM General Schedule Supervisory Guide, June 1998.
3. DoD Supplementary Guidance for the General Schedule Supervisory Guide (GSSG), TS-123, April 1993.
4. NGB-HRC Memorandum Subject: Interpretation and Use of Factor Level 1-3 of the General Schedule Supervisory Guide, dated 28 March 1996.

C. Background: This is a new position located with an Air National Guard (ANG) intelligence unit. Traditionally the part-time structures of these units are filled with military technicians in the Intelligence Career Field (14NX) and the full-time structures of these units are primarily filled with Intelligence Specialist, GS-0132 positions. With the post 9/11 changing homeland security environment and increased homeland security mission tasked to the National Guard, the work of the positions within these units has been expanding. The incumbents must continually collect and analyze intelligence information to be ready for immediate deployment if necessary and to be able to identify potential threats to the security posture within the continental United States.

D. Pay Plan, Series, Title, and Grade Determination:

1. Pay Plan: The position supervises positions performing work covered by a variety of occupational series in the General Schedule and thus the supervisory work performed also falls within the General Schedule.

2. Series: The primary purpose of this position is to command and supervise a crew performing intelligence work related to the exploitation of multi-INT data. In a military unit, positions performing identical work to that of this position fall within the Intelligence Career Field (AFSC 14NX). The work involves the collection and analysis of intelligence data to identify potential threats to the security posture of the country. This type of work is typical of that described in Reference 1 above, thus this position falls within the Intelligence Series, GS-0132.

3. Title: The standard contains two basic titles for positions classified in the GS-0132 series – Intelligence Research Specialist and Intelligence Operations Specialist. The intelligence occupation includes two different kinds of work: (1) intelligence research and analysis and (2) work connected with the organization of activities for the collection of raw intelligence and the dissemination of finished intelligence. Operational intelligence involves the collection of intelligence using a variety of techniques. The intelligence operations specialist applies knowledge of a professional discipline such as military science along with knowledge of the operations and resources of the organizations that make up the intelligence community to a subject-matter specialty in the field of intelligence operations. Examples of these subject-matter specialties contained in the standard include the collection techniques for electronics, intelligence and liaison activities. This is consistent with the intelligence work performed by this position, thus the basic title for this position is Intelligence Operations Specialist.

The position performs both first level and second level supervisory work for 25% or more of the time and thus meets the basic criteria for coverage under reference 1 above. Thus, in accordance with the titling instructions, a prefix of “Supervisory” is added to the basis title resulting in the title of Supervisory Intelligence Operations Specialist.

4. Grade: This position performs both second level supervisory duties as well as non-supervisory Intelligence Operations Specialist work. Both the supervisory and non-supervisory work has been evaluated.

(a) Non-Supervisory Work Evaluation:

OPM STANDARD COMPARISION

The OPM PCS evaluates positions in the GS-0132 series by comparing the work to five characteristics: (1) nature and scope of the assignment; independence of operation and judgment; (3) personal work contacts; (4) nature and scope of commitments; and (5) skills and knowledge required.

The work of this position clearly exceeds intelligence work at the GS-11 level. At the GS-11 level, the specialist is responsible for projects or activities within a specifically defined functional area. The GS-11 specialist prepares parts of more complex studies or reports. This position serves as the commander of a crew responsible for planning missions and overseeing the intelligence work performed by crew members. The mission commander is responsible for reviewing the reports submitted by each crew member, combining them together and preparing and/or approving the final mission report. This matches the general characteristics of work described at the GS-12 level, where the specialist is recognized as an expert responsible for the most complex, difficult or strategic assignments.

Nature and Scope of the Assignment

The incumbent serves as the commander of a ISR unit crew, responsible and accountable for all facets of ISR unit operations and production. He/she provides input on performance evaluation, career guidance, and technical assistance to full-time and traditional intelligence personnel; plans, organizes, establishes, and manages the methodology for deployment and conduct of intelligence operations; prepares and manages the budgeting of fiscal resources for the ISR unit crew to include the forecasting of resources that will be necessary for future requirements. This is a match to the GS-12 level where the specialist undertakes long-range planning in their own work area and presenting their findings or recommendations to superiors.

The incumbent reviews and approves post-mission reports containing the analysis derived from the crew members in each exploitation function. Prepares and releases the final crew commander post-mission report. This exceeds the GS-11 level where the specialist prepares intelligence reports covering information in their assigned area of responsibility and is a much closer match to the GS-12 level involving the preparation of the finished reports.

The work does not meet the GS-13 level. At the GS-13 level the specialist in addition to performing functions characteristic of the GS-12 level, serves on top-level review committees of their own intelligence organization to evaluate, discuss, test and validate intelligence research reports, and intelligence collection programs, plans, guides and manuals before they are approved and released. This level of program evaluation and planning is the responsibility of the functional manager’s office located at NGB. At the GS-13 level, the specialist not only serves as a representative of his/her specialty, he/she also serves as a senior staff member. The senior staff level again, is located at the NGB level and not at a local squadron/group.

Independence of Operation and Judgment

As the Mission Commander, the incumbent reviews mission requirements and independently develops the mission implementation plan, thus the position meets the GS-12 level where the specialist performs his/her duties without specific instructions. Completed work of this position is reviewed in terms of methodology, approach, and the accomplishment of mission goals and objectives that match the GS-12 level where completed work is reviewed in terms of methodology and approach. As the Mission Commander, the incumbent is held accountable for conducting a final review of ISR unit crew members’ work, merging the data provided by each member with that provided by other members of the team, and validating the final assessment prior to the reports being forwarded to the theater of operations.

While the Mission Commander operates with a great deal of independence, there is no evidence that he/she regularly develops new concepts, guides and methodologies in the solution of unprecedented problems, nor that he/she develops experimental approaches and solutions. This level of work is required for crediting the GS-13 level. Thus the position does not meet the requirements for the GS-13 level.

Personal Work Contacts

This position exceeds the GS-11 level. The incumbent does maintain contacts with counterparts in other intelligence organization but the contacts are more for the planning process and go beyond the GS-11 level of keeping abreast of current developments, resolving problems, and providing free flow of information. As the mission commander and thus a senior ranking intelligence specialist, the incumbent is not only expected to provide guidance and technical assistance to the ISR unit crew members, but also to gaining command intelligence specialists and serves to coordinate on projects jointly undertaken by the unit, gaining command, and other organizations. This matches the GS-12 level where the specialist regularly provides guidance and technical assistance to juniors in their own and other intelligence organizations. As the Mission Commander, the incumbent has the authority to commit personnel to missions and special exercises, including coordinating with outside agencies, under the general direction of the unit commander. He/she represents the unit in making agreements and commitments within the scope of his/her assigned functional area of expertise. This is a match to the work described in the standard at the GS-12 level. At this level, the specialist not only carries out personal coordination and liaison with counterparts and colleges throughout the intelligence community, they travel to other areas or countries to explain the needs of their organization or to give expert assistance in their field of competence.

This position does regularly deal with contacts at the GS-13 level. At the GS-13 level, the specialist has extensive contacts with individual of the intelligence community within their own agency as well as other organizations at both the operating and policy levels. This indicates that the specialist is not only an operating intelligence specialist, but also serves in a policy setting position within the agency. This level of policy setting belongs at the NGB headquarters level. While the incumbent attends a variety of conferences and meetings, he/she does not regularly participate in the top echelon intra- and inter-agency planning or work groups as required at the GS-13 level. This level of participation occurs at the NGB headquarters level.

Nature and Scope of Commitments

As the Mission Commander, the incumbent of this position is recognized as an expert on all intelligence work performed by the crew members for the assigned missions. This matches the requirement at the GS-12 level where the specialist frequently represents his/her activity as an expert in his/her area of responsibility.

While some aspects of the work lean toward the GS-13 level, there was no evidence that the incumbent was regularly required while in a Title 32 status to make decisions that are novel in nature and serve as a precedent beyond being precedent setting for the immediate unit. These precedent setting novel and controversial matters should be made at the NGB level and not at the individual Wing level.

Skills and Knowledge Required

The work of this position requires a knowledge level that exceeds that at the GS-11 level. At the GS-11 level, the specialist analyzes and evaluates raw data in his/her functional area in order to produce finished intelligence reports under general supervision. As the Mission Commander, the incumbent must possess expert specialized knowledge of all aspects of intelligence as it relates to the various intelligence missions, to include the specialties of the various crew members (SIGINT, IMINT, ELINT, etc.). This level of knowledge is typical at the GS-12 level and thus this position fully meets the requirements for the GS-12 level.

(b) Supervisory Work Evaluation:

FACTOR FL PTS REMARKS

1. Program Scope and Effect 1-2 350 See Analysis Below
2. Organizational Setting 2-1 100 See Analysis Below
3. Supvy and Managerial Authority 3-3b 775 See Analysis Below
4. Contacts
A. Nature 4A-3 75 See Analysis Below
B. Purpose 4B-3 100 See Analysis Below
5. Difficulty (Base Work) 5-6 800 See Analysis Below
6. Other Conditions 6-5c 1225 See Analysis Below
Adjustment Provision NO
When the level selected for Factor 6 is above 6-3, no adjustment is permitted

TOTAL POINTS ASSIGNED: 3425 GRADE: GS-13


Factor 1 - Program Scope and Effect: FL 1-2 350 Points

Scope
The position exceeds Level 1-1. At Level 1-1, the work directed is procedural and routine. The work performed by the positions over which this position has supervisory responsibility falls primarily within the intelligence operations field. The intelligence series covers two-grade interval administrative positions concerned with advising on, administering, supervising or performing work in the collection, analysis, evaluation, interpretation and dissemination of a variety of information that directly or indirectly affects the national security. This type of work is clearly not procedural and routine and exceeds Level 1-1. It does, however, meet the criteria for the scope portion of Level 1-2. Not only is the work analytical and professional in nature, the unit collects, analyzes and dissemination of intelligence data to supported units. This would clearly meet the Level 1-2 criteria of a typical agency field office, an area office or a small to medium military installation.

Effect
The work of the unit affects the ability of all customer units to access the impact on the operation being supported. As with the Scope, this is a match to Level 1-2 where the services support and significantly affect installation level, area office level or field office operations and objectives.

Level 1-3 is not met. Level 1-3 scope involves the direction of a program segment that performs technical, administrative, protective, investigative or professional work having a coverage that encompasses a state or small region of several states. On 28 March 1996, NGB-HRC issued interpretive guidance on the use of Factor Level 1-3 of the GSSG. While this guidance indicates that the assignment of Level 1-3 is generally not appropriate for positions in the National Guard, it has been found to be appropriate for some of the higher-level directorate and group commander positions. Within the intelligence units, this level would only be appropriate for the unit commander and not at his/her subordinate branch chief levels. Thus this position does not meet the scope requirements for Level 1-3. Before a specific level can be assigned to a position for this factor, that position must meet that level for both the scope and the effect. Since the position does not meet Level 1-3 for the scope, there is no need to show how it does not meet Level 1-3 effect.

Factor 2. Organizational Setting FL 2-1 100 Points

The incumbent is accountable to a position that is two or more reporting levels below the first General Officer. This position reports to the Squadron Commander, who in turn reports to a Detachment, Group or Wing Commander who reports to the first SES or General Officer. Therefore factor level 2-1 is appropriate.

Factor 3. Supervisory and Managerial Authority Exercised FL 3-3b 450 Points

The incumbent performs all of the first level supervisory authorities and responsibilities described at Level 3-2c plus 13 of the 15 duties addressed in the standard for Level 3-3b. While the unit participates in a variety of missions, the resources expended are not significant enough to warrant crediting of duty 4. The example in the system is for a program that has an annual budget at the multimillion dollar level. The other duty listed in the standard that is not performed is duty number 12. National Guard Technicians and/or Active Guard Reservists and not contractor personnel perform the work of the unit, thus duty 12 would not be applicable for this position. Since the standard only requires that a position exercise all of the responsibilities listed for Level 3-2c and at least 8 of the 15 listed for Level 3-3b to be credited with Level 3-3b. Since all of the duties at Level 3-2c are performed and 13 of the 15 duties at level 3-3b are performed, the appropriate level for this factor is Level 3-3b.

The position does not meet Level 3-4. Before Level 3-4 can be contemplated, the position must first meet the requirements for both Level 3-3a and 3-3b (see OPM Digest of Significant Classification Decisions and Opinions November 2000 Article No. 25-08). The incumbent’s managerial authorities are not fully comparable to those that characterize Level 3-3a; he/she is not closely involved with agency-level officials in the development of the overall goals and objectives for the agency's (NGB) intelligence program. Overall goals, objectives, and policies are established by NGB. All long-range plans must conform to the policies established by NGB. The level of involvement in agency-wide program development and program management activities expected at Level 3-3a is not required of this position. Since both Level 3-3a and 3-3b must be met before Level 3-4 can be contemplated and the position does not meet Level 3-3a, Level 3-4 exceeds the requirements for this position.

Factor 4. Personal Contacts
Subfactor 4A – Nature of Contacts Level 4A-3 75 Points

Contacts meet the requirements for Level 4A-3 where contacts are with high-ranking military and civilian managers, supervisors and technical staff at major organizational levels of the agency; with agency headquarters administrative support staff; or with comparable personnel in other Federal agencies. Contacts at Level 4A-3 include those that take place in meetings and conferences and unplanned contacts for which the employee is designated as a contact point by higher management. Likewise, in this position contacts occur in meetings and conferences as well as unplanned one-on-one contacts regarding intelligence operational issues for which the incumbent is recognized as the authoritative point of contact for the specialty supervised. These meetings often require extensive preparation of briefing materials or extensive research of current intelligence issues.

Contacts do not meet the requirement for Level 4A-4. At this level contacts regularly occur with such individuals as key staff of congressional committees and principle assistants to senators and representatives as well as elected or appointed representatives of state and local governments. These contacts take place in meetings, conferences and oversight hearings and may require extemporaneous response to unexpected or hostile questioning. Meetings of this nature would be rare, if at all and would not occur on a frequent enough basis to warrant crediting of this level.


Subfactor 4B – Purpose of Contacts Level 4B-3 100 Points

The incumbent provides authoritative advice, information and guidance regarding current intelligence issues. In addition, he/she coordinates, presents, and negotiates programs, projects, policies and controversial issues of significant impact on supported operational missions. This is a direct match to Level 4B-3 where contacts usually involve active participation in conferences and meetings involving problems or issues of considerable consequence or importance to the program segment managed.

The work does not meet level 4B-4. At Level 4B-4, persons contacted are sufficiently fearful, skeptical, or uncooperative that highly developed conflict resolution skills must be used to obtain desired results. Contacts at this level require significant motivation and persuasion to ensure agreement among participants involving the commitment or distribution of major resources when intense opposition or resistance is encountered due to significant organizational or philosophical conflict. While the missions in which the unit is involved may be complex and require significant expenditures of resources, these resources are not as extensive as would be expected at this level nor is the commitment of these resources met with intense opposition or resistance.

Factor 5. Difficulty of Typical Work Directed FL 5-6 800 Points

The position is responsible for providing direction and supervision over work performed at the GS-11 level. This level best characterizes the nature of the basic, mission oriented, non-supervisory work performed in the organization and which constitutes 25 percent or more of the workload (not positions or employees) of the organization. In determining base level, the following guidance contained in OPM Appeal Decisions C-0801-14-01 and C-1670-13-01 must be considered: “It is well established that positions rarely, if ever, perform the highest level of work 100 percent of the time. Position management studies typically find that grade controlling work is rarely performed more than 75 percent of the time

Factor 6. Other Conditions FL 6-5c 1225 Points

Level 6-4a is appropriate for supervision over work comparable in difficulty to the GS-11 level. This is a second level supervisory position and as such requires a review of Level 6-5c – managing work through subordinate supervisors who each direct substantial workloads comparable to the GS-11 level. This position fully meets the requirements for Level 6-5c in that the program is managed through subordinate supervisors who each manage a substantial workload comparable to the GS-11 level. The subordinate units require substantial coordination and integration of a number of major work assignments, projects or program segments of technical and administrative work. This is comparable to that described at Level 6-4a. To meet level 6-5c, not only does the work have to be comparable to the GS-11 level, the standard also requires that the level of coordination of this work be similar to that described at 6-4a. Since this position meets both requirements for Level 6-5c, the appropriate level for this factor is Level 6-5c.

(c) Summary: The non-supervisory work is evaluated at the GS-12 level, while the supervisory work is evaluated at the GS-13 level. Since the supervisory work is at a higher grade level and constitutes at least 25% of the position’s average workload, the supervisory work is determined to be grade controlling. Thus the correct grade level for this position is GS-13

E. Conclusion: Supervisory Intelligence Operations Specialist, GS-0132-13.

CLASSIFIER: Debra J. Spilman, NGB-J1-TNC DATE: 26 Apr 04